Elements of Grammar and Mechanics of the English Language(1994)


SAMUF Educational Publishers, Uyo

About the Book

TABLE OF CONTENTS
GENERAL lNTRODUCTlON
      01 Background Issues
      O2 Grammar: Take-oh Points
      03 Mechanics of English:A Preliminary Survey
      04 The Text

PART ONE
      1 GOALS, CONCEPTS AND MODELS
      1.1 Goals
      1.2The Concept of Grammar
      1.2.1 Technical Explications
      1.3 Grammatical Models
      1.3.1 The Traditional Model
      1.3.1.1 Problems with Traditional Grammar
      1.3.1.2 The Other Side of Traditional Grammar
      1.3.2 Phrase Structure Grammar
      1.3.3 Transformational Generative Grammar
      1.3.4 Systemic Grammar
      1.3.4.1 Unit
      1.3.4.2 Structure
      1.3.4.3 Class
      1.3.4.4 System
      1.3.4.5 Additional Explications
      1.4 Review Questions
      NOTES TO CHAPTER 1

      2 ELEMENTS, GROUPS AND APPROACHES
      2.1 Elements
      2.2 Grouping cf the Elements
      2.2.1 Opening Class Elements
      2.2.2 Closed System Elements
      2.3 Approaches to Analysis of the Elements
      2.3.1 The Traditional Approach
      2.3.2 The Positional Approach
      2.3.3 The lnflectional Approach
      2.3.4 Synthesis
      2.4 Elements and Functions
      2.4.1 Elements at Sentences and Clauses Levels
      2.4.1.1 Sentence Elements
      2.4.1.2 Elements and Types of Sentences
      2.4.1.2.1 Structurally Determine Subtypes
      2.4.1.2.2 Functionally Determined Subtypes.
      2.4.1.3 Clause Elements
      2.4.1.4 Phrase Elements
      2.4.1.5 Word Elements
      2.4.1.5.1 The Notion and Key Terms
      2.4.1.5.2 Allomorphic Variation
      2.4.1.5.3 Affixation
      2.4.1.5.3.1 Prefixation and Suffixation
      2.5 Review Questions
      NOTES TO CHAPTER 2

      3 NOUNS AND NOMINALS
      3.1 Classi?cation of Nouns
      3.1.1 Proper Nouns
      3.1.2 Common Nouns
      3.1.3 Collectives Nouns
      3.1.4 Abstract Nouns
      3.2 Classi?cation Along the Lines of Observed Characteristic
      3.2.1 Patterning with Modifiers
      3.2.2 Tangible Versus Abstract
      3.2.3 Collective Versus Individual
      3.2.4 Count Versus Noncount
      3.2.4.1 General Formation of Plural
      3.2.5 Human Versus Nonhuman
      3.3 Nominals
      3.3.1 Adjectives as Nominals
      3.3.2 Verbs as Nominals
      3.3.3 Pronouns as Nominals
      3.3.4 Clauses as Nominals
      3.3.5 Phrases as Nominals
      3.3.6 Nominalization of Processes
      3.3.7 Structure of he Nominal Group
      3.3.7.1 The m Element
      3.3.7.1.1 General Occurence of Items within the Element
      3.3.7.1.2 The Nature of Patterning within the rn Element
      3.3.7.2 The h Element
      3.3.7.3 The q Element
      3.4 Review Questions
      NOTES TO CHAPTER 3

      VERBS AND VERBALS
      4.1 Verbs:Their Narure
      4.2 Verbs: Constrastive Pairs
      4.2.1 Base Form!Derived Form
      4.2.2 Regualar/lrregular
      4.2.3 Lexicalmuxilary
      4.2.3.1 Central Auxilary Verbs
      4.2.3.2 Modal Auxiliary
      4.2.3.2.1 Modality in Modal Auxiliaries
      4.2.3.2.2 Negation in Modal Auxilaries
      4.2.3.3 Marginal Auxilaries
      4.2.4 Finite/Nonfinite
      4.2.5 Transitive/lntransitive
      4.2.6 Linking/Nonlinking
      4.2.7 Stative/Dynamic
      4.2.8 Structure of the Verbal Group in English
      4.2.9 A Note on Time, Tense, Mood and Aspect in English
      4.3 Review Questions
      NOTES TO CHAPTER 4

      5 ADJECTIVES AND ADJECTIVALS
      5.1 Meaning and Distinction
      5.2 Criteria for Deterrninating Syntactic Functions of Adjectives
      5.3 Adjectival Position: Additional Notes and Clues
      5.4 Stativc/Dynamic Adjectives
      5.5 Order of Adjectives
      5.6 Adjectival Clauses and Phrases
      5.7 Structure of the Adjectival Group
      5.8 Review Questions
      NOTES TO CHAPTER 5

      6 ADVERBS AND ADVERBIALS
      6.1 The Nature of Adverbs and Adverbials
      6.2 The Morphological Shapes of Adverbs
      6.2.1 Adverbs Derived Through Suffixation
      6.2.2 Adverbs Derived Through Pre?xation
      6.2.3 Adverbs Not Derived Through Af?xatlon
      6.3 Adverbs and Adverbials: Functional Subtypes
      6.3.1 General Functional Subtypes
      6.3.2. Adverbial Clauses
      6.4 Mobility of Adverbf?ldverbials
      6.5 Structure of the Aclverbial Group
      6.6 Review Questions
      NOTES OF CHAPTER 6

      7 CLOSED SYSTEM ITEMS
      7.1 The Set
      7.2 Pronouns
      7.2.1 A Survey
      7.3 Pronouns - Additional Subtypes
      7.3.1 Relative Pronoun
      7.3.2 Partitive Pronouns
      7.3.3 Reflextive Pronouns
      7.3.4 Reciprocal Pronouns
      7.3.5 Interrogative Pronouns
      7.3.6 Demonstrative Pronouns
      7.4 Prepositions
      7.4.1 The Nature/Classi?cation of Prepositions
      7.4.2 Relationship in Space
      7.4.3 Relationship in Time
      7.4.4 Double Function
      7.4.5 Prepositional Phrases
      7.5 Conjuncts
      7.5.1 Meaning
      7.5.2 Coordinating Conjunctions
      7.5.3 Surbodinating Conjunctions
      7.5.4 Conjuncts
      7.6 lnterjections
      7.7 Review Questions
      NOTES TO CHAPTER 7

PART TWO
      8 MECHANICS OF ENGLISH
      8.1 General Issues
      8.2 Punctuation
      8.2.1 The Fullstop
      8.2.2 The Comma
      8.2.3 The Colon
      8.2.4 The Semi-Colon
      8.2.5 The Question Mark
      8.2.6 The Hypen
      8.2.7 The Dash
      8.2.8 Quotation Marks
      8.2.9 The Apostrophe
      8.2.10 The Exclamation Mark
      8.2.11.1 Bracket
      8.2.11.3 Underlining
      8.3 Capitalization
      8.4 Spelling
      8.5 Grammar-Related Mechanics
      8.5.1 Concord
      8.5.2 Parallelism
      8.5.3 Modification
      8.5.4 Fragmentation
      8.6 Review Questions
      NOTES TO CHAPTER 8
      REFERENCES
      INDEX

This book introduces fresh dimensions into both the elements of grammar and mechanics of English; It has enormous potential utility; there is material for almost every learner of EngIish as a second language. Chapter 1,2,3 and 4 are particulazrly rich and are useful at the tertiary level of English education for both students and teachers. chapter 5,6. and 7 are equally rich but the tempo seems to have dropped slightly. Chapter 8 is peculiarly accessible to even users at the pos-primarylevel. Reading the book from the beginning to the end gives one a feeling of having followed the events of a classical drama from exposition to development to complication to a climax, then to a resolution and a final catharsis! On a serious notethe reader feels he has read it all.

It is also a great resource book. There is no doubt that this text will befound useful byawide range of students and teachers in the Faculties of Arts and Education in the Universities. Specifically, students of English Education, Linguistics, Foreign Languages and Communication Arts particularly from their sophomore years will find it a useful guide in the writing courses. Generally, the text will go a long way in righting the wrongs of grammatical inaccuracies or smoothening the rough edges of undergraduate writing.



Contact Information



Feel Free To Contact Me